Category Archives: Places to See

Places to go and things to do

Herman Miller At the Woodson

Exceptional exhibit at the Woodson Art Museum relating to the Herman Miller company.  Now, whenever I hear the name, “Herman Miller,” which I do all the time on NPR, I can’t help but think there is a guy by the name of “Herman Miller” who does nothing but design furniture all day, especially since this company is well known for their wonderful designs.

But turns out that Herman Miller (the man) never really designed anything, he was a fellow with deep pockets whose money kept a struggling furniture  company from going under in the Great Depression.  The company was renamed in his honor, and what an honor it has turned out to be.  You can read all about this on the Hazel Home blog.

In the mean time, save me a spot on the Marshmallow Sofa and I’ll see you at the Woodson!

Senator Clinton Comes to Wausau

I will have much more to say later, but I thought that at least I should get the pictures up that I took today. I pulled rank and identified myself as belonging to the press at the rally today, but only got the good pictures when I went up to the seats where I probably would have been sitting anyway.

I’ll put one picture here and the rest on the Flickr site. Tomorrow, hopefully after a good night’s sleep I will post some commentary on the visit.

Hilary takes a question

Podcast Part 2

Here is the second half of the interview with Wendell Minor, which I did last weekend at the MCPL. If you haven’t already, go one post down and listen to the first part.

For much more about Wendell Minor you can go to his website.

[odeo=http://odeo.com/audio/17712583/view]

Sledding, sledding, sledding

Even though it has been ages since I have posted here regularly, people seem to find the blog on Google. And the number one search term for the last week or so has been “sledding.” Wonderful! But where the heck are all you people?

I have been sledding a few times with the kids over the past 10 days or so, and while we are out on the hill, basically there is no one else out there. Is there some kind of virtual sledding experience I have missed somewhere? Go on out and hit the slopes.

Since it is not immediately obvious where this information is on the County Parks and Rec website, here are the “official” sledding hills at the Wausau area parks:

SLEDDING HILLS

Sledding areas are open as soon as snow cover permits. Two hills have lights for night use. All hill close at 11pm (when parks close). There is no charge to use these hills.

  • Pleasant View Park; 1221 Sumner Street (lights on hill)
  • Riverside Park; 100 Sherman Street
  • Schofield Park; 606 E. Randolph Street
  • 3M Park; 405 Park Blvd (lights on hill)

You may have noticed that I did not include the Sylvan Hill Tubing facility.  First of all, it has its own page on the Parks site, so you can find it more easily, but secondly I am not a big fan of fun that you have to pay for and then stand (or sit) in line.  Nothing wrong with that kind of thing, just not my cup of tea.

My personal favorite sledding hill is Pleasant View Park, where we spent some time night sledding a while ago (one of the lights is misaligned so there is a huge dark patch as you go down — add to the fun!) and had a blast. I have been told by a long time resident that this hill used to a ski hill with a tow rope and everything. It is nice to dream about that tow rope as you trudge up the hill.

But here is the deal people. I need every single one of you to go sledding between now and Saturday. I need all of you, your kids and your neighbor kids to head up to Pleasant View Park and sled for hours and hours and hours. Especially you grown ups. Especially you Wisconsin sized grown ups.

Oh, you say you don’t have a sled?  Worry not!  Just truck on up to Fleet Farm.  The have a huge pile of the plastic “bathtub” sleds.  Nine bucks, holds two kids, goes pretty well on almost any kind of snow.  Can’t beat it.  If you have a big family and a few extra bucks, they have a plastic “luge” that looks like it will hold four people and a dog.  Eighteen bucks.  Cheap at twice the price.  Where else can you have that much fun for a sawbuck?

Now you say, “But Bill, what do you need me for?”  Because it is true, I need you and I need you badly.   You see, this last snowfall, the beautiful light powder that it was, is not the greatest for sledding. Piles up in front of the sled and slows it down. So, I need all of you to pack the snow down between now and Sunday. So that on Sunday afternoon, the kids and I can whiz down the hill with the greatest of ease.

I am counting on you Wausau, I know you can do it!

Unidentified Dudley Object

So, L and I were driving back from the Wisconsin Englishes presentation at UWMC when she turns to me and says, “Do you see that?”

I did indeed. And I took pictures of what we saw. They are NOT photoshopped, if anything, the colors look even richer to the eye than they do to the camera.

Makes for an interesting skyline, that is all I have to say.

Click on any or all of the thumbs for the larger image, but you get the idea.

UDO 7 UDO 6UDO 5UDO 4

UDO 3UDO 2UDO 1

Hunted Like Animals at UWMC

It is not often that a re-run is an important event, but this is one of those occaisions.

UWMC is showing again the film, “Hunted Like Animals” which is a documentary by Rebecca Sommers about the genocide of the Hmong people in Laos.  The film will be shown on October 10 at 7 pm in the college theater, and as usual, you can’t beat the price, it free.

Click for Larger ImageCheng Lee, Director at the Multicultural Resource Center at the college has arranged for Rebecca Sommers to be available by phone after the screening to discuss the film and answer any questions.  Lee said that last year when the film was show there was a panel discussion with a number of local Hmong Elders discussing the film.  That must have been fascinating, and I am very sorry to have missed that.

Most of us in Wausau are aware of the sad recent history of the Hmong people.  To make a long story short, the Hmong people sided with the US during the Vietnam War, and after US troops left Southeast Asia, the Hmong were persecuted by the governments of Laos and Vietnam.  Many Hmong people became refugees settling in Thailand, the US and other places.  But Hmong people still remain in Southeast Asia.  Their plight is still horrific according to Sommers.  Here is a quote from the press release for the film:

Over thirty years and a generation later the Hmong-in-hiding are attacked, chased, raped and killed by Laotian soldiers.  Those who surrender face an uncertain fate. “Hunted like Animals”demonstrates that the Hmong-in-hiding in the Laotian military training areas are going through.   They endure genocide, the reason why many escape to Thailand, and become refugees.  This story of human rights violations on the Hmong-in-hiding must be told. 

And for a story to be fully told, it must be listened to.  I hope that folks will make an effort to come out and see this film so that we can better understand the situation in Laos, and by extension our Hmong neighbors here.  The shared experience and the discussion period are an important part of building our community.

If you would like some previews of the film, Sommer’s site has a number of clips, which you can find here.

See you at UWMC at 7 pm in the theater.

Also Spotted Downtown

Big Boxes are people too!! Please Give!!!

Click for larger image